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Heritage stories

Heritage stories

This stretch of the Bridgewater Canal takes in Boothstown, Worsley, Monton, Patricroft and Barton. All along the canal there are stories to tell, from 1761 right up to the present day.

Discover the origins of the canal, the Duke of Bridgewater and James Brindley. Read about the impact of the Industrial Revolution and Queen Victoria’s visit. And then come right back up to date with stories from people living and working in the area today…

The Barton Swing Aqueduct Model

A working model of the famous Barton Swing Aqueduct was created for the Bridgewater Weekender, the annual celebration of the opening of the canal.  It was used for family-friendly workshops where a replica of  the original stone aqueduct was also created in LEGO. All part of our Est.1761 project to regenerate and celebrate the historic Bridgewater Canal in Salford.

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History of the Bridgewater Canal

A walk along the banks of the Bridgewater Canal is a journey to the past and a glimpse into the future. Every stretch of the waterway has a story to tell us about human ingenuity, endurance and events that shaped both Salford and the world.

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Barton Bridges

Barton has a long association with crossing points. From James Brindley's amazing stone aqueduct of 1761 to the unique feats of engineering heritage that stand there today - Barton Swing Aqueduct and Swing Bridge

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Mapping Memories

The Salford stretch of the Bridgewater Canal has more than its fair share of stories to tell. From its history, intrinsically linked to the Industrial Revolution, to the recollections, personal accounts and tall tales of the people who live and work in the area. 

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Memories of a Boothstown childhood

A mill chimney, the coal mine, dark damp terraced houses, the coal man, the mobile greengrocer... Local resident Elaine Marchment recalls Boothstown as a small village where everyone knew your name. 

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Worsley New Hall

Worsley New Hall was an immense structure designed by architect Edward Blore in the Gothic style. It was completed in 1846 and was the home of the first Earl of Ellesmere. Its most distinguished guest was Queen Victoria who stayed at the hall twice.

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The story of Boothstown

The Bridgewater Canal arrived In Boothstown in 1795 but the area's origins reach back to Roman times and beyond.    

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Heritage Flow

A heritage inspired animation by young people on the Bridgewater Canal in Salford. 

 

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